/347 error on copying my arduino code

It is caused because ” in WordPress is unicode not Arduino code.   You will need to replace every ” with new ones.  I will see who I can get this resolved. 

Christmas came early.   https://inventr.io/ send me a box of new components to come up with interesting projects for them.  Two more UNOs.  I just did a DC motor with a NPN transistor.  I will do the same with a PNP transistor and show how the PWM works differently on them.   I am going to connect back up the LCD displays on pins 10,11, and 13.  

I need to expand my design to 3 levels.  I have two new power adapters coming for the UNOs.    I need room to move components around. 

I have so much stuff for the Arduino project.  I went out and purchased storage boxes, glue gun, soldering iron and label maker.  

I have SIPO and PISO shift registers that I have been using on projects.   All the wires that came with the kits.  I am going through all the components shipped to me and putting them in drawers when I identify them.   I will probably get a second clear drawer cabinet soon.  

I found this kit on Facebook advertised for $29.  The Advanced Hero’s Kit.   You can buy more components from them to expand you building.

Inventr.io main page

Drivers and software

Working with these device to build projects is a lot of fun but you need to learn some basics of electronics.  Below I provide you some of the charts and pictures to help you out.   I created an entire section on Electrical Engineering to explain all the concepts, definitions and other information about V = IR.  Circuit designs and other concepts that will expand what you can build with your Pi and Arduino devices. 

Pull Down Resistor: The 10kΩ resistor is connects the push button to the ground.  Pulling down the voltage always to 0V

Button up: Open circuit.  No current flows.  No voltage drop across the 5V.   The 10kΩ resistor is from the push button to the ground.  If you did a digitalRead from the top of the resistor, read pin will see 0V or read a 0

Button down: Short/Closed:  Current flows through the push button and leaves through the 10kΩ resistor to ground.   If you did a digitalRead from the top of the resistor, read pin will see 5V or read a 1

Pull up Resistor: The 10kΩ resistor is connects the push button to the VCC (5V).  Pulling up the voltage always to 5V.

Button up:  Open circuit.   No current flows. No voltage drop across the 5V through 10kΩ resistor.  If you did a digitalRead on other side of the resistor,  read pin will see 5V and report a 1.  You need to put a ground the resistor to measure it with a multi-meter. 

Button down: short/current.  Current flows through resistor and we get a voltage drop.  If you have a digitalRead on other side of the resistor the read pin would read 0V and report a 0. 

Pull down Resistor

Pull Up Resistor

As you look at my projects for both the Raspberry Pi and Arduino device, you will see me use various pull-up and down-up resistors.   I used pull -down resistors with my Sparkfun 16 channel Analog to Digital Converter to make sure empty channels  when sent to ground so the output voltage is 0 V.    A pull up resistor is used on buttons limits the current going from VCC (3.3V or 5V) through the button and to ground so you don’t damage your device.   It prevents it from floating to an unknown value.   Pull-down keeps it in a low state (0V to ground) or Pull-up keeps it in a high state to your VCC voltage.  

So here is the first resistor.

Brown – black – black – orange – brown.

Brown: 1
Black: 0
Black: 0
Orange: x 1000
Brown: +- 1%

100,000 ohms or 100kΩ

The tolerance is +- 1%.  The multimeter reads 99.6kΩ

Brown – black – black – red – brown.

Brown: 1
Black: 0
Black: 0
Red: x 100
Brown: +- 1%

10,000 ohms or 10kΩ

The tolerance is +- 1%.  The multimeter reads 10.01kΩ

Brown – black – black – brown – brown.

Brown: 1
Black: 0
Black: 0
Brown: x 10
Brown: +- 1%

1,000 ohms or 1kΩ

The tolerance is +- 1%.  The multimeter reads 1.003kΩ

Red – red – black – gold

Red: 2
Red: 2
Black: 0
Gold: +- 5%

220 ohms or 220Ω

The tolerance is +- 5%.  The multimeter reads 214kΩ

LEDs

The LED is 1.5V / 25mA, according to the site.  You have a flat side that on the side of the shorter pin.  This is the negative.  The longer pin is the positive. 

The device is 3.3V and 5V 

 5V:
5V – 1.5V = 3.5V has to be dissipated
V = I x R or Voltage = current x resistance
3.5V = 0.025A x R
R = 3.5V / 0.025A
R = 140Ω

The smallest resistor you can use is 140Ω.  Our kit has 220Ω for the LED.

3.3V:
3.3V – 1.5V = 1.8V has to be dissipated
V = I x R or Voltage = current x resistance
1.8V = 0.025A x R
R = 1.8V / 0.025A
R = 72Ω

The smallest resistor you can use is 140Ω.  Our kit has 220Ω for the LED.  Amazon has the kits.